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Meeting in Beirut, interfaith leaders work toward Middle East peace

first_imgMeeting in Beirut, interfaith leaders work toward Middle East peace Rector Knoxville, TN June 22, 2012 at 4:59 pm The notion that violence does not have any place in the teachings of Mohammed is counterfactual. Among those debating the plan of action at the Beirut Summit were, from left: retired Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey; Sanaa Makhlouf of American University Cairo; Clare Amos, inter-religious program executive of the World Council of Churches; Mufti Malek Shaar of Tripoli and North Lebanon; and the Rev. Chloe Breyer, Episcopal priest and executive director of the Interfaith Center of New York. Photo/Eileen Read[Episcopal News Service, Beirut] A landmark three-day Christian-Muslim peace conference concluded on a hopeful note here by issuing an appeal to religious leaders and institutions to collaborate on promoting human rights, self-determination, peaceful co-existence, and non-violence, particularly in Jerusalem and the Holy Land.“There are over five billion Christians and Muslims throughout the world, and although we do not speak for all of them, we are here to say that violence has no place in the teachings of Mohammed nor Jesus. We are here to say that no one, no one has the right to take the life of another in the name of God,” said the Rt. Rev. John Chane, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, in announcing the agreement to the more than two dozen delegates representing Episcopalians and Anglicans; Roman, Armenian, Melkite, and Maronite Catholics; and Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims.The meeting, second in a planned series of four, broke new ground on several fronts including the presence of high-ranking Shi’ite ayatollahs who flew from Iran to meet with an international Sunni delegation led by Mufti Malek Shaar of Tripoli and North Lebanon, along with Vatican officials and Catholic leaders, including Patriarchate Emeritus of Jerusalem Michael Sabbah and Archbishop emeritus of Washington Theodore Cardinal McCarrick, and the 103rd archbishop of Canterbury, the Rt. Rev. and Rt. Hon. George L. Carey.The Shi’ite delegation’s leader, Ayatollah Seyyed Mohammad-Ali Taskhiri, praised the “beautiful moments of the past two days, moments of compassion, understanding, and freedom. We are all sons and daughters of God, children of God. I felt in these moments that religious leaders have a great role they could play in society. They could be the greatest players to help society reach very high places.”The conference, “Christians and Muslims Building Justice and Peace Together in a Violent, Changing World,” was headquartered in a just-opened seaside hotel in newly reconstructed downtown Beirut, an area left in rubble after Lebanon’s civil war. The delegates met in the city’s rebuilt Maronite cathedral and deliberations took place next door in a modern mosque built as a powerful symbol of mutual tolerance – and yet a reminder of the ever-present threat of Middle East violence. The mosque was under construction when its patron, then-Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, was assassinated nearby in 2005, and conference-goers walked by his adjacent tomb several times a day to and from their meetings.The opening session included hundreds of Lebanese religious and government officials, representing the nation’s sectarian polyglot. Public sessions were attended by former Lebanese President Amin Gemayel, a Maronite Christian leader whose brother and son were both assassinated while holding political office, as well as by former Prime Minister Fuad Siniora.Summit participants found many areas of common cause, including the need to promote freedom of religion and religious education, to halt Christian emigration from the Middle East, to include greater roles for women, and to condemn the “massacres and bloodshed” in nearby Syria, where they sought “to grant the Syrian people their rights to live in dignity and self-determination.”“At various times, despite their teachings, some people have been involved in the killing and oppression of people and denial of their freedoms … includ[ing] intellectual violence,” the group’s Plan of Action said. “Thus, we ask for the language of dialogue and negotiations to prevail over the language of weapons.”The Plan of Action included a clear message that moving forward together requires acknowledgement of centuries of wrongdoing in the name of religion, a message sounded throughout the meeting as delegates such as Catholic Archbishop Patrick Kelly of Liverpool invoked the scars of the Crusades, empire, forced migration, and terrorism. Archbishop Kelly reminded the group of the historic, conciliatory visit of Queen Elizabeth to Ireland last year, and her open acknowledgment that “there were many things that we wish we had done differently, and many things that we wish had never been done at all.”The Summit’s joint statement highlighted the centrality of the occupation of Jerusalem and the Palestinian territories as a source of world conflict. “The resolution, through justice for all, of the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians is an essential foundation to build justice and peace, not only for this region, but for the world,” noted the agreement, in reaffirming the message of a previous summit in Washington, D.C., in 2010.The group listed as its first action item a declaration that “peace will not be achieved unless justice prevails in the world and until all peoples enjoy their full rights, including the right to have their own states and the right to self-determination. We are especially mindful of the violence which the Palestinian people have suffered for more than sixty years. We are also mindful of the international binding agreements, inter alia the relevant United Nations resolutions in this regard, and call for their full implementation.”The action plan stated the delegates’ “full rejection of all attempts to alter the identity of the city of Jerusalem and its Holy Places.”The plan did not address how the religious communities can achieve this or other enormously complex goals that involve the international political arena, though organizers announced that they hope to convene again in the next couple of years — perhaps in Rome or in Teheran — to continue their dialogue. The summit did, however, achieve a major accomplishment in bringing together disparate religious leaders to find commonality.“The climate of inter-religious dialogue has positively changed,” said Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, who heads the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Inter-Religious Dialogue. “But all the great challenges remain to bring this development to the grassroots level.”The steering group included the Rev. Canon John L. Peterson of Washington National Cathedral’s Office of Global Justice and Reconciliation, and the Rev. Msgr. Robert J. Vitillo of the Vatican, and Mufti Shaar’s son Anas, a Lebanese business executive.Among those assembled from the Anglican Communion were officials known for interfaith work: the Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem, Suheil Dawani, leader of 30 parishes and more than 30 social service institutions throughout Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, the Palestinian Territories, and Israel; Bishop Michael Ipgrave of Woolwich, England, former interfaith relations adviser to the Archbishops’ Council of the Church of England; and Clare Amos, inter-religious program executive of the World Council of Churches. Young Episcopalians were represented by the Rev. Chloe Breyer, executive director of the Interfaith Center of New York.Religious leaders’ papers presented at the Summit and details of the group’s 2010 Summit, held at Washington National Cathedral, are available here.– Eileen Read is a freelance journalist based in Los Angeles. Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Middle East Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Tags Dexter Van Zile says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ecumenical & Interreligious, Mark James says: Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK June 22, 2012 at 5:42 pm The problem we face today is that the Palestinians are facing violence from the same people who made them refugees, the Israelis. The abused became abusers.We all need to work on behalf of the Jews and the Palestinians that not only they but all humanity to experience love and compassion. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Charles Smith says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Lilian Patey says: Comments (5) by Eileen White ReadPosted Jun 22, 2012 center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Rev. Robert R. Smith says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC June 22, 2012 at 5:50 pm Without any government sanction or authority, this strikes me as little more than a junket, a waste of funds, and perhaps supporting activities not in the interests of the US. Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN June 22, 2012 at 6:21 pm Mark James is not alone in asking.Any conference on Middle East Peace must include the full Abrahamic Kinship. Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Why is the full Abrahamic Kinship not represented?Re: “The action plan stated the delegates’ ‘full rejection of all attempts to alter the identity of the city of Jerusalem and its Holy Places.’”Do the delegates in their ‘full rejection’ include a rejection of the the attempt by the PA to rewrite history with their claim that there never was a Jewish Temple in Jerusalem?Just asking. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA June 22, 2012 at 3:34 pm “We are especially mindful of the violence which the Palestinian people have suffered for more than sixty years. ”What about the violence that the Jewish people have suffered for thousands of years? Does anyone care about that? Just asking. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Prayers urged, diocese reaches out, as deadly tornadoes hit Oklahoma

first_imgPrayers urged, diocese reaches out, as deadly tornadoes hit Oklahoma Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Rick Britton says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA A couple searches for belongings after a tornado struck Moore, Oklahoma, May 20, 2013. A 2-mile-wide (3-km-wide) tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore on Monday, killing at least 51 people while destroying entire tracts of homes, piling cars atop one another, and trapping two dozen school children beneath rubble. Photo: REUTERS/Gene Blevins[Episcopal News Service] Updated at 11:50 a.m. to include revised death toll, lowered from initial count. Bishop Ed Konieczny called for prayer, while staff and clergy of the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma reached out to the community, after violent tornadoes on May 20 left at least 24 dead, including 7 children, and more than 120 injured near Oklahoma City.As rescuers continued to search for survivors amid the rubble of buildings and widespread debris, the death toll was expected to rise. An earlier figure of 51 deaths was revised down by the Oklahoma Medical Examiners Office, which said it had received 24 bodies, according to reports. “It’s been a pretty rough couple of days” with more storms possible on Tuesday, said Konieczny, during a Monday evening telephone call from his home in Edmond, a northern suburb of Oklahoma City.“We’re still assessing where we are at today,” he said, just a few hours after a mile-wide tornado struck a hospital and two elementary schools in Moore, about 11 miles southwest of Oklahoma City. “Communications are difficult. Cell phone service is sparse. Even landlines are affected. The area where the tornado struck is blocked off, nobody can get in or out.”He said that a storm system, created when cold and warm air masses collide, spawned six tornadoes Sunday and two or three on Monday, including the one in Moore. Winds of up to 200 miles an hour shredded homes and other buildings.“Local clergy are trying to assess damage and to contact their members that live in the areas where tornadoes struck. They are waiting to hear back,” Konieczny said. “We know … that we have a number of members of churches who’ve lost their homes.”A day earlier, on May 19, tornadoes struck Shawnee, about 37 miles southeast of Oklahoma City, killing at least one person.“At this point, there’s been no significant damage to any church properties,” Konieczny said. “We have accounted for all clergy, staff and their families living in areas affected by the storms and tornadoes.”He said that two schools sustained direct hits by the tornadoes while classes were in session. “In one of the schools, 75 students and teachers huddled in a hallway and there’s nothing left. They’re still looking for those persons.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in a May 21 message that the prayers of Episcopalians “are with the people of Oklahoma in the midst of this tragic event. May the Spirit of God hover over the broken, lost, and grieving, and may they meet the love of God in their neighbors’ responses.”Konieczny said he had been in touch with Episcopal Relief & Development as well as local disaster relief agencies. “We are putting things in place to respond to the immediate needs as they become aware to us and are coordinating with other emergency organizations, to work together as they try to respond to this.”On a personal note, he said the roof on his home, in Edmond, Oklahoma, was destroyed by hail and wind damage, “but this is nothing compared to the devastation others have experienced.”The Rev. Canon José McLoughlin, diocesan canon to the ordinary, said he and his family were forced to take shelter on Monday when warning sirens sounded near his suburban Oklahoma City home.“The storm skirted us and went south and east” but this situation is very much still unfolding, McLoughlin said Monday evening. “Casualties are mounting, the devastation is widespread. We’ve been texting to try to communicate and assessing damages to parishioners.”As rescue efforts unfold, “We’re prepared to do what we need to do and we’re going to do what we can,” he added.Some relief efforts are already underway in Shawnee, the Rev. Bill Carroll, rector of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Shawnee, wrote in a May 21 e-mail to Episcopal News Service.“We have identified a couple of parishioners with family members who are injured or who have lost their homes,” he said. “We have no reported loss of life within our parish, but at least one fatality in our immediate community. Our church building is untouched. Our prayers are with people in Moore and southern Oklahoma City where the damage to human life and property was worst.“In Shawnee, we are providing tangible assistance where that is needed and working through our diocese and the Red Cross. On Sunday we’ll be soliciting donations to help.”Also, St. Mary’s Episcopal School in Edmond took to social media to begin relief efforts, inviting donations of children’s books, stuffed animals and other comfort items for the surviving children and families. “The teachers and staff will take the items as a symbol of Edmond’s generosity to the American Red Cross,” the posting said.The Diocese of Oklahoma includes 70 congregations representing about 25,000 Episcopalians and encompasses the entire state. A link for those wishing to contribute to disaster relief efforts has been established on the diocesan website.But Konieczny said that the biggest thing right now, “is prayers for everyone. There’s been significant loss, not only of physical properties, but with the loss of children and other family members. Prayers would really be appreciated for us. There’s the first couple of days of the news of the event, but the real work and the real need for people is going to be in the days ahead.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. May 22, 2013 at 7:37 am Can not watch the news from Oklahoma without weeping. After living through Sandy here at the Jersey shore, I can relate to the people in Oklahoma. People around here walked around in a daze for weeks afterwards. These events are a real “faith shakers”. You find yourself asking “why would God allow a churches, schools and homes to be destroyed?” How is this “looking out for your children?” I think the answer, atleast here in NJ, was to restore our faith in humanity and one another. It is more important what we do in the aftermath to care for each other. Our church will be deciding by Sunday what aid we will be sending. During Sandy, our church was “adopted” by another church in Michigan. They sent a generous donation to aid in our relief efforts which was greatly appreciated. We are considering “adopting” a church in Oklahoma.The church plays a vital and necessary part of the relief and rebuilding efforts in times like these.It takes time to assess the situation to account for parishioners, clergy and property. It took us days to do this after Sandy. It is good other demoninations, Red Cross and others are on the ground but let me assure everyone the needs will be great and go on for months, if not years long after the media leaves. I urge all Episcopalians to give careful thought as to how you will respond as a disciple, parish, or diocese. Contact your priest and get something going like donating loose plate offerings, adopting a church or special fund raising…just do it. Be a “doer of the word” not just “a listener” and pray often for the folk in OK. Blessing to you! Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Comments (5) The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events May 21, 2013 at 6:11 pm I agree and want to donate through the Diocese. May 21, 2013 at 3:30 pm ERD needs to put updated info for donations to this effort on their website. Charity Navigator does not have ERD listed as a good choice for these donations either. It does have the Methodist Church and other churches listed. ERD let everyone know where to direct donations asap please… Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Marylin Day says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group May 21, 2013 at 4:37 pm I concur with the comment about our good ERD being ready to take donations. When I looked this morning there was no mention of tornado on the website. ERD is a good choice for donations. We will check website later. Rector Shreveport, LA May 21, 2013 at 9:09 pm Our prayers are wonderful and needed for the people of Oklahoma. Still, it’s disappointing to hear of all the other Christian denominations already present and acting–doing things to help. If our ECUSA is on the ground, the news service should let us know that. Jon Kopf says: James Saxon says: By Pat McCaughanPosted May 21, 2013 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC sheila greason says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

Jason Lucas named priest-in-charge of St. Edward, Wayzata, MN

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Rev. Jason Lucas has been called as priest-in-charge of St. Edward the Confessor Episcopal Church in Wayzata, Minnesota. Lucas was raised in Arizona in a small copper mining town, a predominately Hispanic community. He grew up in the Roman Catholic tradition and worked for several years with youth. However, as he grew in his faith journey he was challenged theologically by the teaching of the Roman Church. After much prayer and discernment he left the Roman Catholic Church and later took up a youth minister position at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Minneapolis. Lucas entered seminary in August 2010 and completed his Master of Divinity degree at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California, in May 2013. Minnesota Bishop Brian Prior ordained him a transitional deacon in June 2012 and a priest in June 2013. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Jason Lucas named priest-in-charge of St. Edward, Wayzata, MN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR People TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Sep 10, 2014 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

General Seminary trustees issue statement

first_img christopher seitz says: Rev. Judith Clausen says: Fr. Gaylord Hitchcock says: David Henry says: October 29, 2014 at 3:40 pm I write with a greatly saddened heart for what has happened at the General Theological Seminary.I have been an ordained priest and GTS graduate since 1967. I have served congregations of thisNYC area with mostly people of color as am I. How do I represent this institution and support itwhen its new dean is alleged to have said such things. Just recently a priest of another seminarytold me how glad he did not go to GTS. What can I say to that? It should be remembered that there are MANY of us who do not have high position but love the Church and its institutions and we serve such year after year Advent – last Pentecost. Clergy and all the laity will need some answers, ones that look to the Cross of Christ and that victory. Faithfully, a Mary Cooke Hoffmansupporter. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET David Duncan says: October 18, 2014 at 11:31 am What’s truly puzzling here, is how a Dean of GTS with no advanced academic qualifications to speak of, could be allowed to intimidate a distinguished faculty of PhDs. It appears obvious that the board’s inquiry, conducted by a high-end law firm, was limited in its scope, and that the remit was to establish the slippery slope of who said what. In an investigation of this sort, denial or qualification can win the day. This legalistic endeavor was constructed so the board would know as little as possible on an official level about the conditions of faculty employment as established under the current Dean.The Dean’s excuse: “I am human,” does not exonerate him from his responsibilities toward the scholars and students of GTS. It seems obvious that the agenda of dumbing down the GTS educational program can go forward for now. This will rightfully discourage highly qualified prospective faculty and students from applying to GTS for at least a decade. October 17, 2014 at 10:57 pm Eloquently and truthfully said! October 18, 2014 at 11:26 am I am appalled and dismayed at the decisions of the Board yesterday. I have always been proud of my time at GTS, and impressed with the caliber of theological education the seminary has offered. In an atmosphere of distrust and poor leadership, it appears that the Board made its decision to back the Dean without consideration of the concerns of the eight professors fired. To make them come crawling back on their knees for provisional employment is simply unacceptable, and just plain wrong. GTS is losing some of the faculty that form the core of the superb education GTS has always offered in place of keeping a Dean who clearly created an environment too fraught with discord and lack of leadership. Even out of context, as someone above stated, the comments of the Dean are at the least hurtful, and clearly show disregard of the professors and the well-being of the school. I am saddened as I think about the future of the seminary. How can it recover from such a poor decision of the Board to back the Dean and ignore the concerns raised by the “GTS eight?” October 17, 2014 at 10:55 pm The statement of the General Seminary Board of Trustees is a disgrace. The idea that tenured faculty must now petition for “provisional” employment is appalling. They should have been restored to their tenured positions unconditionally as a sign of the Trustees’ desire to put this horrible incident behind them. It is hard to avoid the belief that the General Seminary– of which I am a proud alumnus– can survive. What student would want to go there? What bishop would want to send a student there? What scholar of note would be willing to pull up stakes and accept a professorship there based on the eventual hope of tenure, when the tenure of these distinguished faculty members has been trashed in a stroke by the disgraceful actions of the Board of Trustees? There is only one course of action: reinstate the “General Seminary Eight” immediately and unconditionally, and get back to the business of being the Seminary. Rector Shreveport, LA Bill Borock says: October 17, 2014 at 11:20 pm The board should in all humility resign en masse and ask the entire church community for provisional reinstatement and forgiveness. Very sad indeed. I fear the damage is done and can never be repaired. [General Theological Seminary press release] On October 17, 2014, The General Theological Seminary issues this statement:“Shaping the future leaders of our Church is a responsibility we take very seriously; to that end, the concerns raised by eight members of the Faculty were given full consideration by both the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee. Our chief goal is a fruitful and fulfilling school year for our students.“We are above all an institution of the Church, and we – both as individuals and as officials of the Seminary – strive to conduct ourselves in a manner befitting our guiding Christian principles. In this spirit, the Board has reviewed the findings of an independent investigation and reached three resolutions.“First, the Board has heard the findings of an independent report and the advice of the Board’s Chancellor, and has concluded after extensive discussion that there are not sufficient grounds for terminating the Very Reverend Kurt Dunkle as President and Dean. We reaffirm our call to him as President and Dean and offer him our continuing support.“Second, all eight Faculty members are invited to request provisional reinstatement as professors of the seminary. Our goal in the immediate term will be to promote an atmosphere of reconciliation so that the Seminary can turn the page and move forward with a full focus on the student body.“The Executive Committee stands ready to meet next week to hear requests of any of the eight former faculty members for reinstatement and to negotiate the terms of their provisional employment for the remainder of the academic year.”“Lastly, the Board commits itself to repairing the significant damage this issue has inflicted upon our Seminary, and calls upon all members of the GTS community – the Board, the Dean, students, Faculty, staff, and alumni – to foster greater accountability, repentance, reconciliation, and healing.“For nearly 200 years, the General Theological Seminary has shaped current and future leaders of our Church. In an ever more challenging and volatile world, our Christian faith is an invaluable beacon that we all must strive to protect. We thank our Executive Committee, our Church leadership, our Faculty, and most of all our students for their continued faith during this challenging time. We commit ourselves to meditate upon these scriptures: Matthew 18:15-20, 2 Corinthians 5:16-20, and Ephesians 2:13-14. Luke Brown says: Rev. Judith Clausen says: Irene Sanders says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID October 18, 2014 at 8:41 pm Hear, hear! “The Church” has consistently bullied and abused those of us who call attention to the emperor’s new clothes. Some years ago, lesbians who wanted to attend General found the way barred by a homophobic dean who later came out as a gay man. A few years later, the Church’s Minorities Officer angrily denounced women seeking ordination for “hanging onto the coat tails” of Blacks. Rectors have been allowed to stay in sinecures despite incompetence, venality, and outright felonies. This is simply another in the endless abuses of power that the organization has fomented, in just the same way that the RCs (and Anglicans in Canada) dealt with pedophilia. As Lord Acton (may or may not have) said, “Power corrupts…” …well, you know the rest. DWLindeman says: Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service October 17, 2014 at 7:04 pm It is hard to imagine that the Board fully grasps the extent to which this ongoing saga is jeopardizing the seminary. There is nothing in this statement that suggests anything is going to change. It doesn’t matter if the Board cannot find “sufficient grounds” to dismiss the Dean. This matter should have been handled by him and never allowed to get so out of hand as to jeopardize the future of GTS, This is what deans are suppose to do, and he clearly didn’t. Derek Baker says: October 17, 2014 at 8:39 pm Did former presiding bishop Frank Griswold have any role in this meeting and ultimate decision? The above statement does not indicate a wise or well thought out decision. Comments navigation Newer comments Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Robert E Crystal says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ October 17, 2014 at 9:56 pm This is truly a deeply disappointing and distressing outcome. In his letter on the GTS website, the Dean claimed that the appalling remarks attributed to him were taken out of context. I am unable to imagine any context in which it is appropriate to speak of persons of color doing “interesting things with their hair,” or of “slanty-eyed Asians,” or to say anywhere in public (or at all) “I like vaginas.” I’m embarrassed for GTS, the students, the Church, myself as a GTS alumna, and the Dean. Whatever possessed him? And I understand those were only the surface issues — that much deeper concerns also existed about misuse of power, abusive behavior and bullying. As someone who has been on the receiving end of bullying and abuse of power throughout my ordained ministry, I lament that we, the Church, continue to do little to challenge and change such behavior. I have lost any confidence in the Board and am rethinking any support I can offer GTS if it goes forward as things now are. What a distinguished faculty we had and what a loss! Dan Tootle says: Fr. Gaylord Hitchcock says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Hoyt Tillman says: October 17, 2014 at 10:34 pm It all reminds me of King Lear, stumbling off into madness. This, the most disturbing of Shakespeare’s plays, shows how the world, after the Fall, continues falling. By the way, I knew a Janet Campbell in Carroll Gardens. You certainly write like the Janet I knew! I have retired after many adventures and misadventures. You may remember a David Duncan, once a seminarian at St. Anne and the Holy Trinity. Hope you are well. Would be happy to receive an email. Tags Trey Gorden says: Lesley Northup says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR October 18, 2014 at 1:04 am As a professor, I wouldn’t ask for re-instatement in a case like this. The board seems intent on humiliating the eight that were fired. Translation: “if you grovel, you may have the pleasure of keeping your job until the end of the year.” That’s nothing but another assertion of power by the board. The board seems unable to admit that it’s dean has any flaws. All the flaws are (apparently) on the faculty side. That, as anyone observing social systems knows, is preposterous. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Nicholson White says: October 18, 2014 at 5:43 am If the Dean were a sensitive, aware, thinking Christian, he would resign his post. Or is there something else which has not yet been expressed?? Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA LRHoffmann says: Janet Campbell says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA October 18, 2014 at 10:50 am That was then, this is now. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Dana Robertson says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis R. Gary Alexander says: Craig Slane says: Joseph D Herring says: October 18, 2014 at 12:03 am It seems like the decision to hire the fired teacher’s back on a provisional basis is a way for the GTS to have experienced staff to be available for the rest of the academic year.If the eight fired teachers return in a provisional capacity, what happens at the end of the year?Will the GTS be using the current academic year and the break when the academic year ends, to look for replacements for the now provisional teachers.Is there enough reconciliation there for those with the power, to allow true reconciliation on the part of all the players and to allow the fired teachers to get permanent status?I trust that there could be. That would nice…………………………….. I would trust that there would be, if so What happens at the end of the academic year. Will the GTS fire them again and use the time October 17, 2014 at 11:00 pm I have negotiated international relations. I am a certified facilitator. Likely there are many other laity so qualified. Call on us and back off the political acrimony of the ordained, staff and faculty. We have much to contribute and MANY of us are appalled at the lack of our involvement — as we are dedicated to TEC and GTS and have nothing of personal gain, just want the best for seminarians and the future of the oldest Episcopal Seminary in the USA. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Michael Ryan says: October 17, 2014 at 6:32 pm This is shameful, and I am deeply saddened. The Board has failed us all, and the seminary we love and that formed so many of us and to which we have given our time, talent, and treasure over the years is on a precipice that may not hold. I pray for the students who spent the last month in prayer, worry, and deep sadness as they determine what their own next steps must be. I pray for the postulants and bishops who hoped to find in General Seminary a path toward great theological education and formation of future leaders and priests, I pray for the faculty members who have been asked to come pleading on their knees for a small portion of their former jobs, and I pray for this great Church which is about to lose, I fear, its oldest and greatest seminary. May God have mercy on all of us who let this happen. October 17, 2014 at 10:40 pm A sad day for General, for the Episcopal Church, and for the broader Church. I loved my time at General and am so saddened by what appears to be corporate “CYA” and meaningless rhetoric by a board that was probably hand picked by the current dean.A loss of talented and dedicated faculty.It seems that open mindedness, inclusivity, acceptance of the “other”, and genuine dialogue apply only to those who agree with the dean.Shame. October 17, 2014 at 11:32 pm For the first time in my life, I am ashamed of being an Episcopalian. October 17, 2014 at 7:35 pm Part of the GTS board’s statement says: “We are above all an institution of the Church . . . . ” So much for faculty rights here. We may wonder how GTS will be able to recruit top faculty going forward. This outcome is not unexpected, but it’s quite disappointing. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 October 18, 2014 at 9:47 am There seems to be absolutely no recognition by the GTS Board of Trustees of the damage that is being done to the reputation of the Episcopal Church by this situation. This is a massive failure on the part of the Dean and the Trustees to recognize that GTS must move forward in a progressive manner to be a relevant educator of our clergy. October 25, 2014 at 4:46 pm Best perspective I have heard yet (…said this fellow layperson). I would personally have preferred the board provisionally restore the dean (at most) and unconditionally reinstate the tenured faculty (at least), and not the other way around, just to get my own spoke in; but four-fifths of this impasse seems born of clericalism in the first place — which is probably a broad, pejorative brush stroke nearly impossible to avoid in criticizing decisions taken at a seminary, of all places. Yet all the more reason to broaden the skill, perspective and experience of those working to reach a resolution by seeking out the expertise of the “non-clergy order” in such a situation. John E. Lawrence says: William F. Hammond says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Scott Allen says: October 17, 2014 at 6:12 pm This is truly sad, We will no longer have a seminary in NYC as a result of this action…as Berkeley at Yale grad, that makes me sad. General Seminary trustees issue statement Dunkle to be retained, eight professors may request ‘provisional reinstatement’ Featured Jobs & Calls October 20, 2014 at 7:47 am Saint and Sinner! October 18, 2014 at 1:55 pm This entire business is a blot not only on GTS’s venerable and honored name, but on the mindlessly structured process apparently at work. The Board’s action is as unfathomable as the actions of the Dean leading to the now-tragically resolved impasse. Is this the best that the Board and Bishop Griswold could manage? I can’t imagine circumstances under which these distiguished and respected teachers would go, hat in hand, to the very individuals who have cast them aside, pleading for a provisional faculty appointment, whatever that may precisely be. Having begun selling off the real estate in Chelsea, now it appears that the very stature of GTS is next on the chopping block. A sad day indeed….Was there not a creative way for the Board to respect their appointment, however ill-conceived, of the Dean while honoring the ministries and gifts of the now-dangling teachers? October 18, 2014 at 12:40 am What a shameful and sad spectacle! Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 20, 2014 at 11:31 am I am astounded by what has happened at GST, and further astounded by the intransigence and heavy-handedness of the board. I would have expected more and better of them, particularly the Rt. Rev. Mark Sisk, who up until now I had greatly respected. For me this inadequate and unsettling statement by the board does nothing but confirm that they have handled this matter in a shameful and disgraceful way, and in so doing have done severe and possibly permanent damage to the institution they were appointed to oversee. The fact that Dean Dunkle is apparently exonerated of all responsibility for this crisis, or accountability for his statements, defies belief. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET October 18, 2014 at 2:33 pm I’m sad that The Episcopal Church, an institution that showed me a way forward in my faith at a time when I so desperately needed one, seems serially to fall prey to these bewildering lapses in leadership. I was a member of the parish in question when Rev. Campbell and her colleagues were suffering through the sort of crisis she describes. I have tried to tell myself in the intervening years that this was an isolated incident in an essentially healthy Church, but the actions of Dean Dunkle and the GTS Board offer grim confirmation of what so many of my brothers and sisters have been trying to tell me all along: The Episcopal Church and its mission are suffering at the hands of those called to lead us. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 October 17, 2014 at 7:52 pm This is appalling. Shame on the Board. Posted Oct 17, 2014 Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Michael Ryan says: Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (56) Submit a Press Release October 17, 2014 at 9:22 pm This seems like yet another example of the nationwide epidemic (occurring in all areas of life) of treating managers as being more important than the people who do the actual work of the institution. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York October 18, 2014 at 9:42 am I am concerned and perplexed that people I assumed were more advanced in their maturity, theology and ecclesial knowledge and expertise got into this mess and now cannot find a way out. A way you that will exemplify the “big tent” attributes of the Episcopal Church part of God’s Church. By the way where is that deity in all of this? I haven’t heard from that corner. Has anyone? October 18, 2014 at 1:40 pm Who is doing the (adjunct, etc.) teaching at GTS? The website is a bit vague at this point. Theological Education Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group October 17, 2014 at 10:32 pm What a sad day for General, for the Episcopal Church, and for the broader Church.I loved my time at General and am so deeply disappointed by a decision that appears to reflect the worst of corporate “CYA” practices as well as empty rhetoric at the expense of a wonderful seminary and outstanding faculty.Inclusivity, open-mindedness, and genuine dialogue apparently only apply to those willing to tow the current “party line” and who agree with the dean.Shame on the board. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books October 17, 2014 at 6:53 pm This decision is inexplicable. How does the Dean get a pass on his behavior? Rev. Howard E. Blunt,jr says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Martina J Sierra says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Dann Brown says: Rector Albany, NY Comments navigation Newer comments DWLindeman says: Wendy Gadd says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA October 22, 2014 at 12:52 am Do the Board, the Dean, the Faculty, the Alumni, the Students and other concerned parties understand that the issue is the life or death of the General Theological Seminary? Inflicting a new wound to the body of Christ! Unless a spirit of repentance, forgiveness and reconciliation prevails, and strident voices, punitive actions and pride of position desist, a 200 year old community of faith and learning will cease to exist. Terrible as the recent financial crises have been, the crisis in human relationships that presently prevails is potentially more destructive, and the cynical world will again have cause to comment “see how those Christians love one another!” October 17, 2014 at 9:36 pm Dunkle “success” in the parish is irrelevant. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Rev. Dr. Thomas W. Bauer, GTS ’61 says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL October 18, 2014 at 11:03 am My friend and colleague Fr.Hitchcock makes the case very well. Those of us who were graced by the superb theological education provided by General have some expectations of our administrative leadership. We expect Dean and Board to exemplify the power of reconciliation. What we are getting is the ethical obtuseness you can buy anywhere in the corporate world. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Dale Ann Gray says: Karen Sandness says: Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Los diputados aprueban quitar la bandera confederada

first_img Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Los diputados aprueban quitar la bandera confederada Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Por Pat McCaughan Posted Jul 1, 2015 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY El Muy Rdo. Gary Hall, dean de la Catedral Nacional de Washington, ha prometido remover el vitral de la catedral en que aparece la bandera confederada.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] La Cámara de Diputados aprobó el 29 de junio en una abrumadora votación de viva voz la Resolución D044, que “insta enérgicamente a todas las personas, así como a instituciones públicas, gubernamentales y religiosas, a discontinuar el despliegue de la bandera de batalla confederada”.Los diputados se suman a un creciente número de personas en organizaciones religiosas y seculares que han pedido la discontinuación de la bandera, entre ellos el presidente de EE.UU. Barack Obama.Obama pidió la remoción de la bandera mientras hacía el panegírico del Rdo. Clementa Pinckney, uno de los nueve afroamericanos asesinados durante un estudio bíblico en Charleston, Carolina del Sur, por un autotitulado supremacista blanco.En las últimas semanas, el Muy Rdo. Gary Hall, deán de la Catedral Nacional de Washington, también ha prometido eliminar las imágenes de la Confederación de la catedral, sede oficial del Obispo Primado.La diputada Betsy Baumgarten, de Misisipí, instó a la cámara a apoyar la medida, haciendo notar que los símbolos “ayudan a formar nuestra creencia y nuestra permanente interpretación de Dios y del mundo. Seguir permitiendo que la bandera confederada tenga un lugar en nuestras iglesias dice algo acerca de la Iglesia episcopal”.La bandera del estado de Misisipí incorpora la bandera de batalla confederada en su diseño, en tanto la del estado de Georgia es una modificación de la bandera confederada de las “estrellas y las barras”. La Catedral Nacional despliega las banderas de todos los estados en su nave.Si bien reconociendo que el símbolo es para algunos un signo de su herencia, “para muchos más ha sido y sigue siendo un símbolo de esclavitud, de injusticia y violencia racial —y ahora más que nunca un signo del movimiento supremacista blanco. La bandera de batalla confederada no tiene ningún lugar en una Iglesia que llama a todas las personas bautizadas a respetar la dignidad de todo ser humano”.La resolución dio un paso más allá al desafiarnos “a salir de nuestras iglesias y entablar una conversación con nuestras instituciones públicas y de gobierno acerca de que ese exótico símbolo de odio tenga algún lugar en nuestra actual vida cívica” dijo ella cuando presentó la media a la cámara.Varios otros diputados, entre ellos la Rda. Susan Haynes, de Indiana Norte, y la Rda. Canóniga Victoria Heard, de Dallas, también exhortaron a la aprobación.Recientemente, el Muy Rdo. Anthony P. Clark, deán de la iglesia catedral de San Lucas [Cathedral Church of St. Luke] en Orlando, Florida, dijo en un comunicado que, después de retirar las banderas para limpiarlas él no devolvería la bandera confederada al ámbito de la catedral, según el Rdo. Jabriel Ballentine.“Si la Iglesia ha de ser una como se supone que sea, luego este es un tema que causa división”, dijo Ballentine, de 34 años, rector de la iglesia de San Juan el Bautista [St. John the Baptist Church] en Orlando. “¿Cómo podemos ser auténticos a menos que hagamos todo lo que podemos por desarraigarla de entre nosotros?“Si un grupo dice que no se siente obligado por la oración de los fieles, cuando decimos que todos somos uno, ¿qué estamos realmente diciendo?”.Baumgarten dijo que la remoción de la bandera “es sólo un paso en el comienzo de la difícil conversación que debemos tener sobre el racismo, y acerca de la aceptación de la diversidad en el desmantelamiento de instituciones que rebajan a algunos mientras ensalzan a otros.“Muestra que la Iglesia Episcopal está en sintonía con la conversación que está teniendo lugar en la esfera nacional ahora mismo”, añadió Baumgarten.“Como diputación de Misisipí, sentimos la necesidad de hablar de este tema. Pero no es sólo un asunto nuestro. Llamamos a toda la Iglesia como pueblo de Dios a unirse con nosotros para retirar este símbolo de odio y opresión y trabajar para llevar la igualdad a todas las personas”.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y parte del equipo de ENS que está reportando sobre la 78a. Convención General. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Tags Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC General Convention 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

South Carolina: Charles vonRosenberg to retire as provisional bishop

first_img Posted Jan 14, 2016 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [The Episcopal Church in South Carolina press release] The Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg has announced he will retire as provisional bishop of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina this summer after more than three years leading Episcopalians in eastern South Carolina.In a Jan. 14 letter to the people of the diocese, the bishop said he had officially notified the Standing Committee of the diocese of his intention to retire after June 26, when he completes his schedule of official visits to the 30 parishes and missions of the diocese.“It has been my great privilege to serve in this capacity with the good and faithful people who chose to continue your faith journey as part of The Episcopal Church. These times have been exciting and challenging, and I assure you that I will never forget them or you,” the letter said.A blue-ribbon Committee on the Future of the Diocese was formed last fall. The panel is tasked with making a recommendation to Diocesan Convention in sometime this year about what administrative model will best serve the diocese and its growing congregations in the years ahead. Under church canons, the Standing Committee serves as the ecclesiastical authority when a diocese is without a bishop.“We are so grateful for the leadership and guidance of Bishop vonRosenberg and are so blessed to have had him as our Provisional Bishop for the last three years,” said the Reverend Jean McGraw, president of the Standing Committee. “Although we are sorry to see him step down as our bishop, we are so appreciative of the firm foundation he has laid for our diocese. His insight, experience and faithfulness have instilled in us a bright vision for our future,” she said.This will be vonRosenberg’s second retirement as a bishop. He moved to the Daniel Island community of Charleston with his wife Annie in 2011 after having served for 12 years as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee. (Find more biographical information here.)Under his leadership, the South Carolina diocese has grown to include a staff of five part-time employees plus a wide range of volunteer positions, boards and commissions organized to serve the needs of 30 congregations and an estimated 7,000 Episcopalians in the region.Four annual Diocesan Conventions have been held under the bishop. A major achievement of those meetings was a major update to the constitution and canons of the diocese, restoring provisions that accede to its governance within the Episcopal Church.VonRosenberg was elected as provisional bishop at a special Diocesan Convention in January 2013, which was called to reorganize the diocese after a breakaway group announced it had left the Episcopal Church. Provisional bishops in the Episcopal Church have all the authority and responsibility of other bishops, but usually serve for a limited period of time.Under vonRosenberg, 22 churches remained part of the Episcopal Church, and eight new mission churches have since formed. As part of The Episcopal Church of South Carolina, these congregations are all officially recognized by both the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion. Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Richard McClellan says: Comments are closed. South Carolina: Charles vonRosenberg to retire as provisional bishop Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Brother Tupper, TSSF says: Tags Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release January 15, 2016 at 3:54 pm “The radical message of Christianity–when it is preached and lived faithfully–is that Jesus Christ sees the world through the eyes of the powerless.” —The Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Comments (2) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET January 27, 2016 at 10:27 pm God bless the outgoing Bishop for keeping that diocese together through hard times. Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events People New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Episcopalians bring faith perspectives to Congress on both sides of…

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By David PaulsenPosted Nov 9, 2017 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations counts 40 Episcopal members of the current Congress. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] One is the great-great-grandson of an Episcopal bishop. One grew up across the street from Virginia Theological Seminary. One made his first visit to the nation’s capital as a young chorister singing at Washington National Cathedral.They all have at least one thing in common, in addition to their Episcopal faith: They now are among the 535 citizens serving as senators and representatives in Congress.The United States has a long history of political leaders from the Anglican tradition, starting with President George Washington and many members of first Congress in 1789. The Episcopal Church’s prominence on Capitol Hill has been eclipsed by other denominations as the country has diversified over more than two centuries, though dozens of members of Congress still identify as Episcopalians or Anglicans.“Being raised in the Episcopal Church, which is such an outwardly looking, active-faith community … we tend to be called to try and make a difference,” Rep. Andy Barr, R-Kentucky, told Episcopal News Service in an interview at his Capitol Hill office. “And there’s no other reason to run for public office than to want to make a difference.”ENS interviewed several Episcopalians who serve in Congress to report on the range of ways faith influences lawmakers’ public service. For some, that faith is expressed openly at weekly prayer breakfasts and occasionally in policy speeches. Such public expressions of faith, though, often are tempered by the lawmakers’ awareness of the United States’ constitutional protections regarding religious freedom.Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, speaks during an interview at his Capitol Hill office. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“How do you apply your faith in your political life without imposing your faith on other people? That’s a challenge. That’s a dilemma,” Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, said while speaking with ENS in his office. “My faith is important to me. I use it as a guide in my decision-making, but I don’t feel it is appropriate for me to tell other people what their beliefs should be. And that’s a constant tension.”The Episcopal Church also has a presence in Washington through its Office of Government Relations, which monitors legislation, coordinates with partner agencies and denominations, develops relationships with lawmakers and encourages Episcopalians’ activism through its Episcopal Public Policy Network.That work focuses on areas the church has identified as “being an integral part of Christian calling and witness,” Office of Government Relations Director Rebecca Blachly said in an emailed statement.“Given the impact of the federal government on issues such as homelessness, poverty, healthcare, as well as in the international context and for our Anglican Communion partners, we undertake important public witness for the most vulnerable,” Blachly said.King is a longtime independent who caucuses with Democrats in Congress. When talking faith on Capitol Hill, he believes in humility.“There always has to be a little shred of doubt in your faith,” King said, adding it is no accident that the Nicene Creed begins with the words “we believe” rather than “we know.”He spent his childhood in Alexandria, Virginia and lived for several years in the shadow of Virginia Theological Seminary. His mother was a lay leader in the Diocese of Virginia. His father served on the vestry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. As an adult, his law and business career took him to Maine, where he was first elected governor in 1994. He held that office for eight years and was elected U.S. senator in 2012.He now regularly attends St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Brunswick, Maine, and once described himself to Maine Magazine as “the guy who sits in the back.”“I don’t know how I got into that habit,” King told ENS. He cautioned against reading into that habit any spiritual significance.If you were to categorize the churchgoing persona of Rep. Bradley Byrne, R-Alabama, it might be The Guy Who Wears a Coat and Tie.Rep. Bradley Byrne, R-Alabama, spoke with ENS at the Capitol after speaking on the floor of the House. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceHe typically attends Sunday worship at St. James Episcopal Church when he is home in Fairhope, Alabama, and when he is in Washington on a Sunday morning, you’re likely to find him at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Lafayette Square across from the White House. But in January, on the Sunday after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, he chose a smaller church by the Capitol because he thought it wouldn’t be as crowded.“I went to this church in a coat and tie, and I got there and I looked around – I was the only person there with a coat and tie,” Byrne said in an interview at the Capitol. “This one gentleman came over across the room and sat right next to me, and he said, ‘Everybody’s trying to figure out who you are.’“And when I told him, they couldn’t have been nicer. … I’ve sort of found that the good thing about being in the Episcopal Church, I can kind of alight in any Episcopal Church, some are conservative, some are liberal, some are high church, some are low church, and you kind of get that same warm, welcoming feeling.”Episcopalians, a diverse delegationThe Episcopalians in Congress defy any uniform categorization. They’re just as likely to be Republican as Democrat, and they come from all corners of the country. Texas’ 5th District is represented by an Episcopalian, Rep. Jeb Hensarling, a Republican. Hailing from Oregon’s 5th District, Rep. Kurt Schrader is an Episcopalian and a Democrat.Most of these senators and representatives are white men, though there also are several women, including a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, Rep. Frederica Wilson, a Democrat representing Florida’s 24th district. Some Episcopalians, like King, Barr and Byrne, have only been in Congress a few years. Rep. Louise Slaughter, a New York Democrat and an Episcopalian, has represented her Rochester-area district since 1981.The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations counts 40 Episcopal members of the current Congress. Roman Catholics represent the largest group of lawmakers, with 168, followed by Baptists at 72, according to Pew Research Center analysis. Lawmakers may take their oath with a hand on the Bible, but they are sworn to uphold the Constitution. Each senator and representative brings a personal perspective on how – or whether – faith beliefs should influence public policy.Byrne said he feels guided by “the sort of Anglican approach to understanding truth and what’s right and what’s wrong” – the “three-legged stool” of scripture, church traditions and individual reason or discernment.“I’ve found that’s served me well throughout my life, before coming to Congress and in Congress,” Byrne said. “Scripture, tradition and reason are a big part of the way I approach things because that’s how I was brought up.”Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Washington, also credited her faith and the Episcopal Church with shaping her commitment to community service, “whether it was when I was a vestry member, a PTA mom, a Stephen Minister or serving in Congress.”DelBene wasn’t available for a Capitol Hill interview but said in an emailed statement for this story that her public life is partly rooted in faith principles.“I’ve always fought for those who need a helping hand because our communities are stronger when no one is left behind,” DelBene said. “Those driving principles continue to serve me in my current role in Congress and I’ll keep looking for ways to work across the aisle to ensure everyone can succeed.”Barr credits his faith with introducing him to Washington, D.C., about 30 years ago. He was in sixth grade when he performed at National Cathedral with the choir from his church.That experience played only an indirect role in calling him to public service, but Barr feels directly influenced by his “thinking church,” which he says encourages an open mind.“It’s a church that teaches the love and compassion and grace of Christ, but it’s also a church that is willing to take on the difficult task of discerning scripture and thinking through it,” he said. “That allows for people of a lot of different perspectives to be welcome in the Episcopal Church.”That wide spectrum includes some lawmakers who downplay the active role of faith in political life.“It’s not something that I affirmatively think about,” Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-Rhode Island, said in an interview with ENS in his office. He sees faith as part of his DNA rather than something to wear on his sleeve. “It’s not like, what should my faith principles say about this? It’s much more embedded than that.”Limits on religion in politicsWhitehouse, whose ancestor, the Rt. Rev. Henry John Whitehouse, was a bishop of the Diocese of Illinois in the 19th century, attended Episcopal church services growing up and went to St. Paul’s School, an Episcopal college prep school in Concord, New Hampshire. He is still an Episcopalian but now prefers worshipping at Central Congregational Church in Providence, Rhode Island, when back in his district.He also is wary of politicians injecting faith into the work of government, and that was part of his message in 2014 when he spoke at a lobby day event held by the Secular Coalition of America, an atheist group.Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-Rhode Island, met with ENS in his Capitol Hill office. Photo: Episcopal News Service“People of faith can recognize and respect the views of people who do not have faith,” Whitehouse told ENS. “They are as welcome and important a part of the American experiment as people who hold divergent faiths. … They, too, are all God’s children.”Whitehouse sees “a natural corrective” to religious overreach in Congress, because legislation that crosses that line will face a tougher time garnering enough support for passage. There are fewer checks on federal judges once they are seated, Whitehouse said. As a member of the Senate Judicial Committee, he thinks it is fair to ask court nominees about their faith to ensure it won’t eclipse the law in deciding cases.The issue came up this fall in questioning of Trevor McFadden, a Trump nominee to a federal district court post. McFadden is a member of an Anglican congregation in Falls Church, Virginia, which formed after members of a Falls Church congregation left during a theological dispute. Whitehouse riled some conservative critics by asking McFadden whether he, despite his church’s beliefs, would uphold the Supreme Court’s decision allowing same-sex marriage. McFadden responded he would.“He answered well, and I voted for him,” Whitehouse told ENS.Byrne has sought to defend religious freedoms, too, but from the opposite side of the gay marriage issue. He was a co-sponsor of a bill in 2015 called the First Amendment Defense Act that would bar “discriminatory action” against people, such as business owners, who follow religious convictions that gay marriage is wrong. The bill never made it out of committee.“For us to tell somebody you can’t act out your faith in the way you conduct your business, I think that’s antithetical to the First Amendment,” Byrne said.Such a stance may be in line with many of Byrne’s constituents, though it puts him at odds with the Episcopal Church, which just last month spoke out on the side of a gay couple who were denied a wedding cake by a Colorado cake shop. That legal case is now before the Supreme Court.The Episcopal Church regularly takes values-based public stances on public issues, including through the Office of Government Relations’ advocacy in Washington.“All of our advocacy is based on General Convention resolutions and thus reflects the will of the Church,” Blachly said, while stressing that her office takes a nonpartisan approach.“We know that Episcopalians in the pews also have a diversity of political opinions, and we realize it is possible to have different views on the best way to achieve a more just and compassionate world,” she said. “Bipartisanship, as well as respectful listening and dialogue, is central to all of our engagement as we build relationships with members of Congress, the administration and federal departments and agencies.”Sometimes Episcopalians in Congress are closely aligned with their church on certain issues, as Whitehouse is on climate change. That and ocean quality are important in his coastal state, while the Episcopal Church has promoted environmental stewardship for decades. The House of Bishops also made environmental justice one of the themes of its September meeting in Alaska.“God has made nature pretty resilient if she’s only given a chance, and the oceans are perhaps the most spectacularly resilient of all,” Whitehouse said. “But they’ve got to be given that chance.”Differing on issues, united by faithOn some issues, however, the church may find itself in the middle of a partisan divide. The Trump administration’s pursuit of greater restrictions on refugee resettlement sparked opposition this year from the Episcopal Church, whose Episcopal Migration Ministries is one of nine organizations that facilitate that resettlement on behalf of the State Department.A policy alert issued in October by the Office of Government Relations warned of “devastating consequences for refugees” who are barred from entering the United States.Republicans have generally been more supportive of the president’s refugee policies. Both Byrne and Barr spoke in favor of the refugee resettlement program while citing national security as a legitimate reason to tighten the process, at least temporarily.Rep. Andy Barr, R-Kentucky, speaks about his faith as an Episcopalian in his office in Washington. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceSuch a policy position doesn’t necessarily contradict the church, Barr said.“We may come at the issue of refugees or immigrants differently and we may have some disagreements,” Barr said, “but I think all of us in Congress who are Episcopalians, we believe that this country is a nation of immigrants. … We believe in the duty and the obligation of our country to offer refuge and asylum to the politically and religiously oppressed.”Faith also can provide common ground, a bridge across the partisan divide. King regularly attends the Senate’s weekly interfaith prayer breakfast, “the only bipartisan event around here.” Only senators are invited, and 20 or more typically attend any given Wednesday morning in a room at the Capitol.“It’s my favorite hour of the week,” King said. The event is a chance to get to know his fellow senators, Republicans and Democrats, as real people rather than political opponents, and he frequently learns something new about them.Byrne, too, sees faith as “a force for unity” and often attends House prayer group meetings that draw members of both parties.His religion became an issue in the 2016 election, when a Republican rival who is Baptist tried to argue Byrne, as an Episcopalian, wasn’t conservative enough for his Alabama district. That line of attack didn’t gain much traction, Byrne said.“I’m not going to back down from the fact I came to Christ through the Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church continues to feed me day to day, week to week, month to month,” he told ENS. “And the other people of faith in my district, particularly those that know me, respect me for that.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopalians bring faith perspectives to Congress on both sides of political aisle Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Faith & Politics Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

Church of England invests in enabling contactless digital giving in…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Church of England] More than 100 churches across the Diocese of Carlisle will be the first to take part in a national pilot scheme to help encourage contactless giving, making giving easier for congregations. The pilot will help pave the way for a £1.25 million investment from the Church of England, which will see thousands more churches accept contactless and digital payments over the next two years.The funding will be used to provide contactless devices for churches. Consideration for connectivity in rural settings has been taken into account, with churches being offered one of two types of device, depending on each parish’s context.Two further pilots will take place in other dioceses later this year before the nationwide roll out begins.Read the entire article here. Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Church of England Rector Shreveport, LA Anglican Communion, Posted May 26, 2021 Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Church of England invests in enabling contactless digital giving in parishes Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Coffee With a Cop Takes on New Meaning

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSApopka Police DepartmentChief Michael McKinleyCoffee With a Cop Previous articleCorrine Brown Indicted – Pleads Not GuiltyNext articleJogging Strollers Recalled Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 center_img Coffee with a Cop events are intended to provide a casual social environment where citizens and police officers can get to know each other.  In the aftermath of the shooting of 11 law enforcement officers in Dallas last night, tomorrow’s event in Apopka takes on greater significance and purpose.Apopkans can not only come and get to know Apopka Police Officers, but we can also show the community’s support for those who protect us every day.Apopka’s next Coffee With a Cop event will be TODAY at the Main Street McDonald’s in Apopka from 8:30 – 10:00 AM. Chief Michael McKinley, the Apopka Police Department and McDonald’s will again be the hosts.Chief McKinley made this statement in reference to the Dallas shootings: “We are all saddened by the horrific events that occurred in Dallas. The men and women of the Apopka Police Department appreciate the tremendous support we receive from our community. The Apopka Police Department is holding the next “Coffee with a Cop” tomorrow morning from 8:30 – 10:00 at the McDonald’s on Main Street. In response to the community’s desire to hold a moment of remembrance and prayer for the victims of the Dallas Police Department, as well as recognize the members of the Apopka Police Department, at 9:00 a.m. we will take a moment to pray. I encourage everyone to stop by and meet members of the Apopka Police Department and join us in this moment of fellowship.” Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom McDonald’s and the Apopka Police Department  have held two previous Coffee With a Cop events this year.  One in January and the second in April. McKinley considered both events successes.“I am extremely pleased with the community’s turnout for the Coffee with a Cop events,” he said. “These are great opportunities for the public to meet Apopka Police officers in a social and casual environment. I have received a lot of positive feedback from not only the public, but members of the department.”Coffee With a Cop  is a nationwide initiative by police departments to get to know the public in a more neutral and less adversarial setting. In Apopka, that neutral non-adversarial setting is McDonald’s. McKinley sees these events as a chance to listen to the community.“We plan on continuing this event every couple of months and look forward to the community’s participation. We understand policing is not possible without input and involvement from the citizens. I want to take advantage of every opportunity for members of the public to build a positive relationship with members of the department. We can’t do this job without them. We live in this community, too; the citizens’ concerns are our concerns.I invite all members of the community to stop by to meet with us on Saturday to have a cup of coffee, talk about those issues affecting our community, and get to know us by first name.”last_img read more

In case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here 5 stories that shaped Apopka’s news weekCity Council votes to extend medical cannabis moratoriumBreaking: Brummer confirms run for County CommissionHickerson site to become gateway birding parkApopka Police Department and OCSO partner for youth basketball weekVelez-Cantres named Apopka Police Officer of the Year Please enter your comment! TAGSWeek in Review Previous articleDonna’s Deals: 10 Must Know Laundry HacksNext articleJune 12th: A day of unity and remembrance of “the 49” Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more