Category Archives: ynsyap

Carpenter slapped with 3 additional charges

first_imgForty-seven-year-old Anand Bhola of South Section, Canal Number Two, West Bank Demerara (WBD), who was earlier this month arraigned on theft allegations amounting to $564,000, is once again slapped with three additional charges.He appeared before Magistrate Rochelle Liverpool on Thursday last and denied that on April 24, 2018, at North Section Canal Number Two Polder, he stole 15 Mamey fruits belonging to farmer “Deoranie”.The defendant was also accused of stealing Kaopattie Samaroo’s 16 oranges and 15 lemons between December 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017. These items amounted to $5,100. He was further implicated in a break-and-enter and larceny which occurred between June 25, 2017 and August 8, 2017 at Canal Number Two, where he was accused of stealing items from “Etwarie’s” dwelling house. Those items are valued at $140,000.Bhola denied the charges, but the court was informed that he has pending matters. As such, Magistrate Liverpool released him on $20,000 bail on each of the two simple larceny charges, and $60,000 for the break and enter and larceny allegation.Unrepresented, he was ordered to report to the Wales Police Station one Friday in each month as the case continues.It was only last week that he was similarly accused of committing at least two break-and-enter-and-larceny offences in his neighbourbood earlier this year. The carpenter, who is also a father of two, was accused of breaking and entering the premises of Lakeraji Ramdyall between January 3 and 4, 2018, at South Section, Canal Number Two and stealing items amounting to $185,000.Represented by attorney-at-law Paul Fung-A-Fat two weeks ago, the defendant was further accused of breaking and entering the dwelling house of North Section, Canal Number Two resident Mohammed Rasheed, where he allegedly stole property amounting to $379,000. This included a laptop computer and two power drills. Bhola entered not-guilty pleas on both charges.Bhola admitted to Magistrate Liverpool that he faced a similar charge before, but claimed that the charge was dismissed.The prosecution at that time was disallowed from entering two separate charges which were determined to be out-of-date. The defendant was granted $160,000 bail pending trial for the other matters, which will continue on June 7 2018. Police have been ordered to return to their owners the recovered items that were allegedly stolen.last_img read more

Grizzly Hit by Vehicle

first_imgThere’s still nothing from the RCMP or Provincial Wildlife Officers but, we have unofficial reports, both responded Thursday night, to a bear siting, in Northeast Fort St. John.The reports say a Grizzly bear was spotted in a residential neighborhood, but then disappeared, after police but, before, wildlife officers arrived on scene.These reports also suggest before the bear was relocated, it was struck and killed by a truck, on either a bypass road or the cities 100th street exit. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Sluggish? Not these Sabres

first_imgWhen the Buffalo Sabres introduced their new logo and home and away uniforms lastJune, the reaction from fans was overwhelmingly negative. The new crest, a stylized charging bison, was widely ridiculed as looking like a garden slug or a hairpiece. A petition, circulated online, demanded that the Sabres drop the new design and vowed a boycott of any merchandise that featured it. For a time, the petition was the fourth-most active on PetitionsOnline.com, trailing only those protesting the war in Lebanon, the Mexican election and FIFA’s suspension of Marco Materazzi after the World Cup final. The petition drew more than 31,000 signatures. In 1996, a Vermont company was hired to redesign the uniforms. The colors were changed to red, black and silver, and a new bison logo was added. Fans derided it as the goat head. When the Sabres were rescued from bankruptcy by the Rochester millionaire Tom Golisano in 2003, he noted that the No.1 request he heard from fans was to restore the original colors and crest. The great majority of Sabres merchandise that has sold so well is of the “Buffaslug” design. “We’re still backlogged eight to 10 weeks in our store,” said Michael Gilbert, the Sabres’ director of public relations. “We sell far, far more of the new stuff.” Drew Celestino, the 24-year-old behind the Fix the Logo campaign, said he had deactivated the petition. But after Buffalo’s 10-0 start in October, Sabres merchandise began flying off the shelves. Even as the signatures and the ridicule piled up, Sabres gear became No. 1 on NHL.com. Buffalo fans have had a passionate history with the Sabres’ uniforms since the team was founded in 1970. The original owners, Seymour Knox III and Northrup Knox, chose the blue-and-gold colors because they matched those of their polo club. The crest was a charging bison over crossed swords. center_img “It definitely captured a sentiment,” he said. “But it turns out that a lot of fans in Buffalo don’t really care what they’re wearing, because they’re going to support the team regardless. The Sabres could be wearing pink bunnies, and that’d be fine with people. They’re that hot.” Bruins trade Stuart to Flames: The Boston Bruins traded defenseman Brad Stuart and forward Wayne Primeau to the Calgary Flames for defenseman Andrew Ference and forward Chuck Kobasew. Stuart, a key player in lastseason’s trade that sent former Bruins captain Joe Thornton to San Jose, had been mentioned in recent trade talk because of his upcoming free-agent status. Boston’s inability to work out a new contract with Stuart forced the deal, completed just over an hour after the Bruins beat the New York Islanders 4-3 in a shootout. “It became evident that when I wasn’t having success signing Brad that I was going to have to trade Brad,” general manager Peter Chiarelli said. The 27-year-old Stuart was acquired with Primeau and Marco Sturm on Nov. 30, 2005, for Thornton – who went on to win NHL MVP honors with the Sharks last season. Belanger dealt again: In a deal between first-place teams, the Atlanta Thrashers traded defenseman Vitaly Vishnevski to the Nashville Predators for center Eric Belanger. Belanger, 29, who set career highs with 17goals and 37points for the Kings last season, was dealt by the Central Division-leading Predators just one day after being acquired from Carolina for center Josef Vasicek. Also: Sabres left wing Paul Gaustad will miss the rest of the season because of a sliced tendon in his left leg that will require surgery. … The Montreal Canadiens placed defenseman Craig Rivet on the injured list because of pneumonia. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

All is not well on the Western water front

first_imgAccording to some long-term projections, the mountain snows that feed the Colorado River will melt faster and evaporate in greater amounts with rising global temperature, providing stress to the waterway even without drought. This year, the spring runoff is expected to be about half its long-term average. In only one year of the past seven – 2005 – has the runoff been above average. Everywhere in the West, along the Colorado and other rivers, as officials search for water to fill current and future needs, tempers are flaring among competing water users, old rivalries are hardening and some states are waging legal fights. Water wrangling In one of the most acrimonious disputes, Montana filed a suit in February in the U.S. Supreme Court accusing Wyoming of taking more than its fair share of water from the Tongue and Powder rivers, north-flowing tributaries of the Yellowstone River that supply water for farms and wells in both states. Preparing for worst-case outcomes, the seven states that draw water from the Colorado River – Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico in the upper basin and California, Arizona and Nevada in the lower basin – and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which manages the river, are considering plans that lay out what to do if the river cannot meet the demand for water – a prospect that some experts predict will occur in about five years. “What you are hearing about global warming, explosive growth – combine with a real push to set aside extra water for environmental purpose – means you got a perfect situation for a major tug-of-war contest,” said Sid Wilson, the general manager of the Central Arizona Project, which brings Colorado River water to the Phoenix area. New scientific evidence suggests that periodic long, severe droughts have become the norm in the Colorado River basin, undermining calculations of how much water the river can be expected to provide for the region’s future and intensifying pressures to find new solutions or sources. Drying up The effects of the drought can be seen at Lake Mead in Nevada, where a drop in the water level left docks hanging from newly formed cliffs, and a marina surrounded by dry land. Upriver at Lake Powell, which is at its lowest level since spring 1973, receding waters have exposed miles of mud in the fingered side canyons leading to the Glen Canyon Dam. In California, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has sounded alarm bells by pushing for a ballot measure in 2008 that would allocate $4.5 billion in bonds for new water storage in the state. The water content in the Sierra Nevada snowpack has reached the lowest level in about two decades, state hydrologists have reported, putting additional pressure on the nation’s most populous state to find and store more water. “Scientists say that global warming will eliminate 25 percent of our snowpack by the half of this century,” Schwarzenegger said recently in Fresno, “which will mean less snow stored in the mountains, which will mean more flooding in the winter and less drinking water in the summer.” Get in line Under the West’s water laws, claims are hierarchal. The oldest, first-filed claims, many dating to pioneer days, get water first, with newer claims at the bottom of the pecking order. Still, some of the sharpest tensions stem more from population growth than cautionary climate science, especially those between Nevada and Utah, states with booming desert economies and clout to fight for what they say is theirs. Las Vegas, the fastest growing major city in the country, and the driest, developed the pipeline plan several years ago to bring groundwater from the rural, northern reaches of the state. The metropolitan area, which relies on the Colorado River for 90 percent of its water, is awaiting approval from Nevada’s chief engineer. Ranchers and farmers in northern Nevada and Utah are opposed to the pipeline plan and have vowed to fight it in court, saying it smacks of the famous water grab by Los Angeles nearly a century ago that caused severe environmental damage in the Owens Valley in California. “Southern Nevada thinks it can come up here and suck all these springs dry without any problems,” said Dean Baker, whose family’s ranch straddles the Nevada-Utah border, pointing out springs that farmers have run dry with their own wells. “We did this ourselves. Now imagine what pumping for a whole big city is going to do.” Meanwhile, Utah has proposed a $500 million, 120-mile pipeline from Lake Powell to serve the fast-growing city of St. George and Washington County in the state’s southwestern corner. Nevada officials have said they will seek to block that plan if Utah stands in the way of theirs. Dennis J. Strong, director of Utah’s Division of Water Resources, said Nevada was protesting too much and instead should be cheering the Lake Powell project because Colorado River water that Utah does not use would flow in Nevada’s direction. Strong said Nevada’s protests “may be a bargaining chip.” He said he hoped for a compromise that would allow both projects to move forward. Under an agreement with environmentalists, the federal Bureau of Reclamation plans to closely monitor the environmental effects of using the plant, and study, among other things, using the purified water for purposes other than meeting its treaty obligations, like supplying the growing cities around Yuma. What unites the Western states is a growing consensus among scientists that future climate change and warmer temperatures, if they continue, could hit harder here than elsewhere in the continental United States. “The Western mountain states are by far more vulnerable to the kinds of change we’ve been talking about compared to the rest of the country, with the New England states coming in a relatively distant second,” said Dr. Michael Dettinger, a research hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey who studies the relationships between water and climate. Dettinger said warmer temperatures have pushed the spring snowmelt and runoff to about 10 days earlier on average than in the past. Higher temperatures would mean more rain falling rather than snow, compounding issues of water storage and potentially affecting flooding. In some places, the new tensions and pressures could even push water users toward compromise. An agreement reached a few years ago between farmers and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the chief supplier of water to that region, is one model. Under the terms of the agreement, farmers would leave their fields fallow and send water to urban areas in exchange for money to cover the crop losses. “I definitely see that as the future,” said Robert W. Johnson, the Bureau of Reclamation commissioner.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A Western drought that began in 1999 has continued after the respite of a couple of wet years that now feel like a cruel tease. But this time people in the driest states are not just scanning the skies and hoping for meteorological rescue. Some $2.5 billion in water projects are planned or under way in four states, the biggest expansion in the West’s quest for water in decades. Among them is a proposed 280-mile pipeline that would direct water to Las Vegas from northern Nevada. A proposed reservoir just north of the California-Mexico border would correct an inefficient water delivery system that allows excess water to pass to Mexico. In Yuma, Ariz., federal officials have even restarted an idled desalination plant, long seen as a white elephant from a bygone era, partly in the hope of purifying salty underground water for neighboring towns. The scramble for water is driven by the realities of population growth, political pressure and the hard truth that the Colorado River, a 1,400-mile-long silver thread of snowmelt and a lifeline for more than 20 million people in seven states, is providing much less water than it had. last_img read more

Abraham has no regrets about Nigeria snub

first_img0Shares0000Burton-on-Trent (United Kingdom) (AFP) – New England call-up Tammy Abraham says he never considered playing for Nigeria at international level despite repeated overtures from the Nigerian Football Federation.BURTON-ON-TRENT, United Kingdom, Nov 7 – New England call-up Tammy Abraham says he never considered playing for Nigeria at international level despite repeated overtures from the Nigerian Football Federation.Abraham’s father is Nigerian and a childhood friend of Nigerian federation president Amaju Pinnick, who claimed in September that Abraham had decided to play for the west African country. But Abraham, an England Under-21 international, denied the claim and having been called up for England’s forthcoming friendlies against Germany and Brazil, the striker is not entertaining second thoughts.“I see myself as being a long-term England player,” Abraham, 20, told reporters at England’s St George’s Park training base in Burton-on-Trent, central England on Monday.“That is where my main focus is and I am 100 percent focused here to try and get into that team.“I was pretty set on England really and playing in the Premier League meant it would be nice to play in the England team as well.”Abraham is on loan at Swansea City from Chelsea and has scored five goals in his first 14 appearances for the Welsh club.Asked about Nigeria’s interest, he said: “It was flattering, but for me my main focus was here. It was nice to know that I was doing something right and going in the right direction.”England play world champions Germany at Wembley on Friday and tackle Brazil at the same venue on November 14 as they launch their preparations for next year’s World Cup in Russia.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Man found unfit to stand trial in stepfather’s beating death

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LANCASTER – A Lancaster ex-convict accused of killing his stepfather has been deemed mentally incompetent to stand trial for murder. Franklin Forch, 44, will be sent to a state mental hospital until he is deemed competent to stand trial. Milton Tutt, 68, was beaten Sept. 26, 2004, during an argument at the family’s Kingtree Avenue home and died Nov. 9, 2004, officials said. Forch has a state prison record dating back to 1988 for attempted robbery, transportation or sale of drugs, possession of a firearm by an ex-felon and burglary, California Department of Corrections records show. He was last released from prison in August 2003. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventlast_img read more

ROSSES C.D.P. WELCOME THEIR NEW WELLBEING COORDINATOR

first_imgSocial PrescribingThe Rosses CDP have a social prescribing and Wellbeing Coordinator  who is now covering the Rosses and Fintown primary care areas. If you feel that you need some support to mind your health and wellbeing the coordinator will help you by using resources within your community by meeting people or taking part in a new activity. Tel  074 95 61686 or mobile 0871511855 for further information.  EventsCommunity Coffee Morning and Craft Circle for July. Come and join us on Thursday mornings for a social cuppa. 10.30 am to 12.00 in the Rosses CDP Chapel Rd Dungloe.And if you’re into crafting feel free to bring along your craft e.g. your knitting / sewing/ crochet/ card making. There is no craft facilitator at this gathering, just a group of tea/coffee drinkers & handcrafters eager to learn and happy to share tips and advice. No booking required. All welcome.Social morning on Wednesday the 27th July 11am – 1pm. Come and join us for a morning of Music and  Culture in the Rosses CDP Dungloe. Music by Michael Coyle.Upcoming courses for SeptemberDecoupage, Dance Yourself Fit, Quilting, Flower Arranging, Tin Whistle Classes, and Art. Each class will run for 6 weeks. Cost €40 payable on booking – non refundable. Booking essential.Upcycling Workshop Weekend on Saturday and Sunday for €60. All bookings for the courses will be taken before Wednesday 7th September. For information Tel 074 95 61686. The office of the Rosses CDP will be closed on Mondays for the month of July .  ROSSES C.D.P. WELCOME THEIR NEW WELLBEING COORDINATOR was last modified: July 5th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CDP Na RosannRosses CDPwellbeing coordinatorlast_img read more

IT’S MORE THAN A WEEK LATE, BUT HEATWAVE IS ON ITS WAY (SAY FORECASTERS!)

first_imgSunshine at Buncrana by Chris PlummerDONEGAL will shake off the final drizzle this weekend – and will be basking in temperatures up to 25C by the middle of next week.It’s more than week after forecasters had hoped.But it is DEFINITELY on the way this time, says Met Eireann. “The rest of the country will start to see fine weather from Friday but there is a low front which will spoil things in the North West for a time,” said a spokesman.“We think that will shift over the weekend with the warm weather spreading from the south to Donegal by Sunday and into Monday.“It will be very very warm this week and it looks as if it will last at least a week if not much longer.“Like a lot of forecasters we have been waiting for this and it has finally arrived.” Below is the full Met Eireann forecastOUTLOOK: Becoming even warmer with temperatures on average rising to between the low to mid 20’s (even higher into next week). High pressure will dominate well into next week ensuring predominantly dry weather with just gentle breezes; variable cloud cover to begin this weekend (risk of sea fog feeding into some Atlantic fringes) however sunny skies should develop more widely into next week.FRIDAY NIGHT: Most areas will be dry with clear spells; cloudier however near Atlantic fringes with the risk of little mist or drizzle. Relatively mild with lowest temperatures of 8 to 12 degrees Celsius; values falling lowest further east. Winds will be just light southerly, a little fresher closer to coastal districts.SATURDAY: Most areas will see a dry day with variable cloud cover across the country; brightest across the eastern half of the country. However a weak weather front will feed in rather dullish skies to the west and northwest, with the likelihood of a little rain here (amounts fairly small though). Afternoon temperatures will rise to between 20 and 23 degrees Celsius over much of Munster, Leinster, the midlands and east Ulster. Elsewhere (the northwest, west and perhaps the far southwest of Munster) values will be somewhat lower ranging 15 to 18 degrees Celsius. Southwest winds will be no more than light to moderate in strength.SUNDAY: Dry across most if not all of the country in near calm conditions. Again variable cloud is expected; cloudy in parts to begin but warm spells of hazy sunshine should manage break through. Highest temperatures will typically range 20 to 24 degrees Celsius; best values across the south of Munster and the south of Leinster; sea breezes however will keep temperatures a little lower closer to the coast. MONDAY: Even warmer with good spells of sunshine for the main part (sunniest further east). Again staying dry with temperatures rising to between to low to mid 20’s. Winds will be just light easterly.Present indications suggest the very warm and settled spell will hold well into next week; and where it may be a little dull (though warm) in parts to start off this weekend, sunnier skies are more likely to dominate through the week ahead.IT’S MORE THAN A WEEK LATE, BUT HEATWAVE IS ON ITS WAY (SAY FORECASTERS!) was last modified: July 5th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BUT HEATWAVE IS ON ITS WAY (SAY FORECASTERS!)donegal weatherIT’S MORE THAN A WEEK LATElast_img read more

Plastic is not fantastic as fears grow for Lough Foyle

first_imgAn Inishowen farmer fears that large volumes of plastic and rubber currently washing up on the shores of Lough Foyle could be causing serious long-term damage to the local environment.Much of the material is coming from the unregulated oyster farming industry, which has sprung up in recent years, with plastic bags, tags and rubber straps routinely washing ashore.Billy Doherty, who has lived all his life at Whitecastle House on the shores of Lough Foyle, says the problem is worse than ever. A walk along the foreshore in front of his 18th century home reveals scattered items of shiny plastic and rubber lying in all directions, byproducts of the thousands of oyster trestles in the water nearby.In ten minutes he is comfortably able to collect approximately twenty thick rubber straps and tags. In recent months he has gathered more than fifty oyster bags. All this in a supposed area of special conservation for seabirds.“The amount of waste is just unbelievable. You would have to see it to believe it. I’m fed up gathering it and no one seems to be taking responsibility for it,” he says.“We have never seen anything like this before — and it has to be having a detrimental impact on the environment, particularly in the long-term.” Billy says he has nothing against those involved in the shellfish industry but it must be properly regulated and monitored.“I’m not faulting the local fellow trying to earn a few pounds but there have to be rules and regulations in any industry like this.”“I don’t want to create a problem for anyone trying to earn a living but people need to take responsibility for the environment too. There has been no environmental impact study carried out here or planning permission granted for these trestles.”To exacerbate the problem, no one seems to willing to tackle the issue, with the disputed nature of the waters of Lough Foyle contributing to perennial inaction from all sides.“Nobody is doing anything about it. Both sides don’t want to know. They are ostriches burying their heads in the sand, hoping the problem will eventually go away — but it’s not going away. It’s getting worse.” The problem is worse on the Inishowen side of the Foyle because it offers easier access to the shore.Though the waste isn’t confined to the oyster industry.Billy says general plastic waste is also a growing problem, with increasing amounts of plastic bottles and containers washing ashore.Almost all of it could have been recycled. “It really isn’t that hard for people to recycle. We have four recycling bins here and everything is easily organised once you start,” he says.Who governs the waters of Lough Foyle?The Loughs Agency is the authority that regulates Lough Foyle but it does not have the jurisdiction to confiscate the trestles on the Donegal shoreline.Donegal County Council says the area below the high watermark is “not within our remit” but is instead governed by foreshore licences that are managed by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.When asked why it doesn’t remove the oyster trestles from Lough Foyle, the Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine said:“The exercise of jurisdiction within Lough Foyle is an issue the resolution of which will facilitate the licensing of aquaculture by the Loughs Agency in accordance with the intentions of the two governments under the 1999 agreement establishing North/South implementation bodies.”“The two governments agreed in 2011 to address these issues in the round and officials have met regularly since then. The Irish government is committed to bringing these talks to a successful conclusion.”Plastic is not fantastic as fears grow for Lough Foyle was last modified: May 11th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Billy DohertyfarmerInishowenLough FoyleplasticWhitecastlelast_img read more