Ban deeply concerned about proposed Israeli settlement activity in West Bank

24 July 2008Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has expressed deep concern about the announcement today of the initial approval by the Ministry of Defense of 20 residential units in the Israeli military post of Maskiyot in the West Bank. “The Secretary-General has stressed many times before that settlement construction or expansion is contrary to international law,” his spokesperson said in a statement.It is also contrary to Israel’s commitments under the international plan for Middle East peace, known as the Road Map, and the Annapolis process, the statement added, referring to the peace process launched in the United States city of that name late last year.Mr. Ban urged Israel to heed the call of the Middle East Quartet – the diplomatic grouping comprising the UN, the European Union, Russia and the United States – to freeze all settlement activity, including natural growth, and to dismantle outposts erected since March 2001. read more

No need to praise army for good deeds says Wigneswaran

The Security Forces are building houses for the displaced and giving back lands which they had taken during the war. “The people should be grateful to them for all this,” Samaraweera said. Wigneswaran said that the Tamils should accept what the armed forces are now giving them, but they need not feel “grateful” because these are only “reparations” for the damage inflicted on the Tamil civilians for years. “There is no need to praise the army for what they are doing.”Commenting on the demand to encourage civil-military cooperation to develop the Tamil areas, Wigneswaran said that military involvement with civilians is both unnecessary and  unhealthy. The controversial Chief Minister of the Northern Province C V Wigneswaran says the Tamils need not praise the Sri Lankan armed forces for their post-war development work in the North because these are only “reparations” for what they did during the 30 year conflict, the New Indian Express reported.He was commenting on Sri Lankan Foreign Minister Mangala Samaraweera’s statement in Keerimalai in Jaffna last weekend, that the Tamils should praise the armed forces for the many good deeds they are doing after the war. He has also alleged that the Security Forces are behind the rising crime in the North. The army ,of course, denies this stoutly. (Courtesy Colombo Gazette) “Like the judiciary, the armed forces should keep away from civilians,” he said.If civilians mix with armed forces personnel, the former will get into undesirable ways, he added.Wigneswaran, like other Tamil politicians, blames the army and the police for rising drink and drug addiction among Tamil youth in the post-war era. read more

Afghan interpreters to be granted UK visas as relocation scheme extended

Dozens of Afghan interpreters who served alongside British troops will be granted the right to live in the UK, following a review of Government policy.Approximately 50 frontline volunteers who served in Helmand province will be granted visas, the Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has said as he praised them as the campaign’s “unsung heroes”.They will be allowed to resettle in the UK with their wives and children, taking the total of new visas issued to around 200.The decision follows years of criticism of the Government’s treatment of Army interpreters, whose participation in the Nato effort places them at grave risk of reprisals.Many have since received death threats, including some who have been murdered in their own homes. They served our nation with dazzling distinctionGavin Williamson, Defence Secretary More than 7,000 Afghans provided some form of assistance to the British effort in Afghanistan, codenamed Operation Herrick, between 2002 and 2014, roughly half of whom were translators. Mr Williamson said reviewing the existing scheme would honour the interpreters’ “extraordinary service.”Writing in the Daily Mail, he said: “Frontline patrol interpreters were the unsung heroes of the military campaign in Afghanistan.“They served our nation with dazzling distinction.”The announcement follows bitter criticism yesterday from the chief executive of the Afghan Government, Abdullah Abdullah, who accused the UK of failing the individuals, whom he said took “even bigger risks than the soldiers”.“I know they did their job, taking a big risk in very difficult, life-threatening circumstances, some come from very rural areas and the risk for them today is even greater,” he said, adding that the interpreters acted in the belief they would be given sanctuary in Britain. Approximately 400 former interpreters have been relocated to Britain so far, however many more are struggling to gain visas.Those who have won visas recently called on the Government to provide the same support packages offered to British soldiers to help them transition to civilian life.They have also been fighting against a £2,389 fee charged for those granted indefinite leave to remain after their five-year residency permit expires, which the Home Office agreed to waive last monthThe announcement comes days after the Afghan Government requested Britain send more troops to help the 300,000-strong Afghan security and defence forces quell a resurgent Taliban.It follows reports that a former Afghan interpreter for the SAS was being denied entry to the UK despite being hunted by the Taliban. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

The 9 at 9 Sunday

first_imgEVERY MORNING, TheJournal.ie brings you the nine stories you need to know as you kick off your day.1. #COURT The seven men who were questioned in relation to an incident in Thurles on Thursday morning are to appear in court today, charged with aggravated burglary. They will appear before a special sitting of Cashel District Court at 11am.2. #FOUND An 81-year-old man, Thomas Chambers, who was reported missing from Crumlin in Dublin yesterday has been found safe and well, gardaí said this morning.3. #POLL Labour and Fine Gael have received a boost in the latest Red C/Sunday Business Post poll. While support for FG is unchanged, it is up three points for Labour. Support for Fianna Fáil and Sinn Féin dropped by 1 per cent and 2 per cent respectively. More than half of voters said the coalition “had done a good job leading Ireland out of the bailout”.4. #DEAL An interim deal has been reached in Iran for the country to roll back its nuclear programme. The deal was reached after marathon talks in Geneva, involving some of the world’s top diplomats.5. #FORCED LABOUR British police are planning on carrying out DNA tests on the three women found in domestic servitude in London, the Sunday Times says. This is to establish if either of the older women is mother to the younger woman. Concerns have been raised over whether UK laws would make it difficult to bring a prosecution in the case.6. #SYRIA More than 11,000 children have died during Syria’s civil war, the BBC reports. The Oxford Research Group says that hundreds of children have been targeted by snipers, while some have been executed and tortured.7. #HSE A HSE report, seen by the Sunday Independent, shows that taxpayers are funding the private pensions of 29 senior hospital managers, amounting to €345,000 a year.8. #BANKING Cork retail giant the Musgrave Group is planning on setting up a new Irish bank, the Sunday Independent reports. It says the company could end up offering debit cards, loans, insurance and credit cards, and is considering launching the business next year.9. #VOLCANO Thousands of people have fled from the area around Mount Sinabung in western Indonesia after it erupted eight times in just a few hours. It was said to have been ‘raining down rocks’ and spewing out red-hot ash.last_img read more

Galaxy S4 OLED display consumes twice as much power as the iPhone

first_imgSamsung may have proudly announced the Galaxy S4 would have the world’s first 5-inch 1080p display using their Super AMOLED technology, but they left out what such an advancement would cost in terms of battery life.Your display will always be the thing that eats the most battery on your smartphone or tablet, there’s just no way to escape that. When you compare the specs of any given smartphone, it’s easy to gloss over what the display technology is. The focus is usually on screen size, what kind of glass is covering the display, and what the resolution is. If you’re looking at a Samsung Galaxy S4 over other phones this year, you may want to take into consideration how expensive the new Super AMOLED display is going to be in terms of day-to-day use.Easily the most expensive part of powering any display is the light source. LCD displays, like the ones seen in the iPhone 5 or HTC One, use an LED backlight to show what is on the screen. OLED displays don’t use a backlight, since the OLEDs themselves act as the light source. But OLED panels like the one in the Galaxy S4 consume much more power when they are pushed beyond 50% of their maximum lighting potential.In comparing these two phones specifically, the Galaxy S4 display required 1.5 watts to reach full brightness, while the iPhone 5 only required .74 watts.The display technology isn’t the only part of this experience that will suck battery life down faster on the Galaxy S4, though. There’s a pretty significant difference in how much energy would be required to draw images on the S4’s screen.The iPhone’s 1136 x 640 resolution at 326ppi sounds pretty weak when compared to the 1920 x 1080 resolution at 441ppi of the S4. But it also costs the iPhone 5 a whole lot less in system resources to draw the same image because of that lower resolution display.Samsung compensated for this extra draw by offering a much larger 2600mAh removable battery, compared to Apple’s 1440mAh fixed battery. Despite the significant difference in battery size, there’s very little difference between the Galaxy S4 and the iPhone 5 when it comes to day to day battery life.If you are in an environment where you are able to lower the brightness of your screen, the S4 battery should make it through the day. If you’re outdoors, however, or in any environment that would require higher brightness levels, don’t forget your charger.Now Read – Exynos based Galaxy S4 has been rooted, Snapdragon still waitinglast_img read more

Wikipédia lapplication officielle est de sortie sur Android

first_imgWikipédia: l’application officielle est de sortie sur AndroidLa fondation vient de publier sa première application mobile officielle, disponible gratuitement sur l’Android Market.Wikipédia proposait déjà une version en ligne adaptée aux mobiles, et des développeurs avaient également proposé des applications officieuses d’accès au contenu de la plus grande encyclopédie en ligne du monde. Mais désormais, le site, l’un des plus visités sur le web, dispose de son propre logiciel mobile. Sans grande surprise, Wikipédia, encyclopédie ouverte et libre est disponible en premier lieu sur la plateforme de Google, elle aussi open source, Android.À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?L’application, selon Clubic, donne accès à près de 20 millions d’articles dans 280 langues. Un mode déconnecté est présent pour sélectionner et ajouter en favoris des pages de l’encyclopédie et les utiliser en zone non couverte par un réseau 3G. Dernière fonction, moins attendue, la possibilité d’utiliser la puce GPS pour se géo-localiser. L’application, à partir de cette donnée, pourra se transformer en guide touristique et afficher quantité de documents et d’informations sur les lieux les plus proches de la position de l’utilisateur. L’interface est basée sur Google Maps, et affiche tous les lieux sur un plan avec une pastille pour chaque endroit à découvrir, aussi bien en vrai qu’à travers l’encyclopédie. Le 21 janvier 2012 à 11:15 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Sokratis Arsenal are only at 7080 right now

first_imgArsenal defender Sokratis Papastathopoulos insists there is more to come from them, despite being on a 17-match unbeaten runOn the return from the international break, Arsenal claimed a 2-1 win at Bournemouth in Sunday’s Premier League fixture.The result leaves Arsenal just a point adrift of a top-four spot in the league table – which is new manager Unai Emery’s main target.But Sokratis believes that Arsenal must still improve if they are to reach the Champions League spots at the end of the campaign.“We are around 70-80 per cent,” Sokratis said on Daily Mail.“Of course we need to improve, of course we would like to put Arsenal in the top teams in the Premier League – we try every day for this.“We need to improve, sometimes to not lose the ball or when we have the ball to finish the action and score. That is the difference, we need to improve and we know this.”Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…Arsenal will face Vorskla in Ukraine on Thursday in a Group E Europa League match before hosting rivals Tottenham at the Emirates Stadium on Sunday.“Our focus is on (being one of) the best four teams,” added Sokratis.”We have confidence but it is not easy, we know.“Next week is very important, it is good this week that we didn’t lose points because we go next week full of confidence and we will see. It will be difficult.“I don’t think it is a game that can give you the Champions League. For example, if we win against Tottenham and lose some other games, it is the same thing.“For me, it is very important that in every game we look different, win every game, we go for the win in every game and in the end we will see how it is going. But, of course, Tottenham is a very important game.”Since arriving from Borussia Dortmund in the summer, Sokratis has made 11 starts for Arsenal in all competitions.last_img read more

Vancouver eatery On the Border closes

first_imgOn the Border, a Texas-based Mexican restaurant chain, has abruptly closed its single Vancouver location amid a swirl of legal claims against the restaurant’s franchise owners over unpaid rent and taxes.The closure of the restaurant at 1505 S.E. 164th Ave. apparently was sparked by a three-day eviction notice served to restaurant operators Sept. 15 for unpaid rent and taxes. The notice was included in a lawsuit filed Sept. 23 in Clark County Superior Court seeking $12,666 in overdue rent payment and $33,092 in unpaid taxes. The restaurant closed after the eviction notice was served and before the court filing, said Josephine Townsend, a Vancouver attorney representing property owner Vancouver Border LLC, a Washington-based corporation affiliated with Farmers & Merchants Bank. The Long Beach, Calif.-based bank acquired the property through a foreclosure in 2009, according to court documents. The bank had no comment.Court records list the restaurant operator as Washington-based Vanborder Partners LLC. Tax documents from the Washington State Department of Revenue list an address in Irvine, Calif., that appears to be in a shopping mall. An operator’s representative could not be reached. On the Border, based in Irving, Texas, did not respond to a request for comment.The site is being marketed by Kidder Mathews. Ryan O’Leary, a company vice president listed as one of the property brokers, said the 6,300-square-foot building in the Fisher’s Landing Plaza is well-located with high visibility, a traffic signal, and a free-standing building with parking.last_img read more

Garbage dumped on roadside locals fume

first_imgKondapur: The roadsides of the area near the 8th battalion HP petrol pump and Kondapur Balaji temple has turned into a garbage dump yard for the past several years. Plenty of garbage were dumped including plastic waste and was not cleaned. The garbage that is left on the sides of the road is also increasing the menace of dogs in this area. Adding to this there are many mosquitoes and unpleasant smell every day for the nearby residents.last_img

Blame mathanxious parents for poor results

first_imgIf the very thought of a maths test makes you break out in a cold sweat, the attitude of your parents may be partly to blame as a new study has found that parent’s math-anxiety negatively affects kids.When math-anxious parents frequently pay attention to child’s math homework, the children learn less math over the school year and are more likely to be math-anxious themselves, the findings showed.“We often do not think about how important parents’ own attitudes are in determining their children’s academic achievement,” said one of the lead researchers Sian Beilock from the University of Chicago in the US. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“But our work suggests that if a parent is walking around saying ‘Oh, I don’t like math’ or ‘Maths makes me nervous,’ kids pick up on this messaging and it affects their success,” Beilock pointed out. These findings suggest that adults’ attitudes toward math can play an important role in children’s math achievement.“Math-anxious parents may be less effective in explaining math concepts to children, and may not respond well when children make a mistake or solve a problem in a novel way,” said Susan Levine, professor at the University of Chicago.The researchers earlier found that when teachers are anxious about math, their students learn less math during the school year. The current study is the first to establish a link between parents’ and children’s math anxiety.last_img read more

VIDEO Neuroimaging Advances at RSNA 2016

first_img Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more SCCT news and videos Sponsored Videos View all 142 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Technology Reports View all 9 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more news and videos from AAPM.center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 15:33Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -15:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Videos | Neuro Imaging | December 12, 2016 VIDEO: Neuroimaging Advances at RSNA 2016 Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Max Wintermark, M.D., professor of radiology and chief of neuroradiology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, explains trends and recent advances in neuroradiology at RSNA 2016. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.last_img read more

Eat your fears NC restaurant serving limitedtime tarantula burgers

first_img Share Friday, April 20, 2018 << Previous PostNext Post >> I ate a tarantula and I got a t-shirt @BullCityBurger #wral pic.twitter.com/hlH5Ydw38r— Kathy Hanrahan (@WRALeighWood) April 12, 2018In an interview with Reuters, restaurant owner Seth Gross said that he only gets 15 farm-raised tarantulas each year. Anyone who wants to sample one has to fill out a lottery ticket; if their name is drawn they have two days to collect – and eat – their prize.More news:  Windstar celebrates record-breaking bookings in JulyThe challenge kicked off on April 4, and will continue every day while supplies last, reports USA Today.But be prepared to pay up – the Tarantula Burger, which comes complete with gruyere cheese, spicy chili sauce and a side of ‘Dirty Fries’ will set you back a hefty $30. But the upside? If you eat the whole thing, you’ll receive a limited-edition Tarantula Challenge t-shirt, plus bragging rights for the rest of your life. Travelweek Group Posted bycenter_img Eat your fears: NC restaurant serving limited-time tarantula burgers DURHAM, NC — Waiter, quick, there’s a tarantula in my burger!But wait, before you ask to speak with the manager, that tarantula is supposed to be sitting atop your patty, looking chargrilled to perfection and frightening as hell.Bull City Burger and Brewery in Durham, North Carolina is causing stomachs to churn with its new ‘Tarantula Burger’, the star dish for its annual ‘Exotic Meat Month’. In past years, the eatery has served up everything from iguana and camel to alligator and creepy-crawly insects.Sounds gross? Maybe, but you’d be surprised by how many people go ga-ga over gross.Martha did it yesterday, Randall did it today, and now it’s David D’s turn to give it a shot!David D. ticket # 907656 give us a call and claim your tarantula burger. pic.twitter.com/rZh5cvTHKB— Bull City Burger (@BullCityBurger) April 6, 2018 Tags: WTF This is Martha. Martha successfully ate a burger, topped with a tarantula this evening. Think you could? Sign up for the challenge & if your name is chosen, you’ll have the chance. #BCBBExoticMeats #BCBBExotixMeatMonth** Next up? Randall K., ticket no. 907647 – give us a call pic.twitter.com/2efW8ojnaz— Bull City Burger (@BullCityBurger) April 6, 2018last_img read more

Guatemala detains 13 retired military officers for war crimes

first_imgGUATEMALA CITY, Guatemala — Security forces in Guatemala arrested 13 retired military officers on Wednesday, all charged with committing forced disappearance and other human rights crimes during the country’s civil war, the Prosecutor’s Office announced.Spokeswoman Julia Barrera said the arrests took place in the departments (provinces) of Guatemala and in Alta Verapaz, in the country’s north.Among those detained were former army chief of staff Benedicto Lucas García, who served during his brother Romeo Lucas García’s presidency (1978-82). Lucas Garcia’s time in office is among the bloodiest of the 36-year conflict.“According to the investigation … these people were involved in the forced disappearance of men, women and children during the armed conflict, Barrera said.The detentions came shortly before the Jan. 11 start of a special tribunal to try ex dictator Efraín Ríos Montt for genocide — the latest of several trials against him. Ríos Montt will be represented in court by his lawyers as he suffers from dementia and other medical problems.If convicted, the former dictator would likely be confined to a hospital or put under house arrest because of his deteriorated health.Guatemala’s civil war left more than 200,000 people killed or disappeared, according to a United Nations truth commission. The U.N. found that state security forces were responsible for 93 percent of war crimes. Most of the massacres registered during the war were committed in the country’s western highlands, an area with a high indigenous population. Facebook Comments Related posts:For justice in Guatemala, ‘2 steps forward, 1 step back’ Guatemala high court paves way for new genocide trial against ex-dictator Ríos Montt Guatemala retrial of ex-dictator Ríos Montt suspended Former Guatemalan police chief to stand trial for 1980 Spanish Embassy fire that killed 37last_img read more

Spring Lake youth joins Rep Price as Rep For A Day at

first_img01Oct Spring Lake youth joins Rep. Price as ‘Rep For A Day’ at state Capitol Categories: News LANSING – Rep. Amanda Price, R-Park Township, welcomed Megan Norton, 10, of Spring Lake as ‘Rep For A Day’ on Tuesday.Joining Megan at the state Capitol was her father, Chad.“I enjoyed having Megan as a junior representative on Tuesday,” said Rep. Price. “Megan, like so many other children that participated in the ‘Rep For A Day’ summer reading program, worked very hard to have this opportunity. I know for me, working with children makes this one of my favorite events as a state representative.”Among the highlights from being ‘Rep For A Day’ was a swearing-in ceremony on the House floor, a tour of the Capitol building, participation in a mock Committee Hearing and a lunch in the Speaker’s library.Megan was chosen to participate in the state government proceedings by participating in the ‘Rep For A Day’ summer reading program, sponsored by Rep. Price, throughout her 89th District.State Rep. Amanda Price welcomed Megan Norton of Spring Lake to the state Capitol Tuesday. Norton, 10, was selected for her participation in the ‘Rep For A Day’ summer reading contest. Norton visited Rep. Price in her Lansing office, took an oath as a ‘junior representative’ on the House floor, attended a mock committee hearing, and shared lunch with other junior representatives.last_img read more

Rep Noble invited to lead House invocation

first_img Categories: Noble News,Noble Photos 13Jun Rep. Noble invited to lead House invocation PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Jeff Noble of Plymouth on Tuesday gave the invocation for the Michigan House of Representatives. Noble is a pastor at Praise Baptist Church in Plymouth.last_img

Rep Lucido bills protect taxpayers from paying for emergency manager negligence

first_img21Aug Rep. Lucido bills protect taxpayers from paying for emergency manager negligence A pair of bills introduced by state Rep. Peter Lucido address the status of emergency managers when it comes to bonding and immunity.House Bill 4861 requires emergency managers to post a bond of at least $5 million, and causes the bond to be forfeited if the emergency manager is found to be grossly negligent in execution of their duties.House Bill 4861 and 4862 exempt emergency managers from governmental immunity.“In this state, we make requirements of people who are in certain trades to be licensed, bonded and insured before they take on any jobs involving third parties,” said Lucido, of Shelby Township. “If an emergency manager is doing work under the direction of the governor, that manager should be bonded so that taxpayers never have to foot another bill for a malfeasance of duties or when individuals who are appointed aren’t performing up to the standards of a private practice.”The bills are reintroductions of bills Rep. Lucido filed in his first term in direct response to the information which came out of the actions of various emergency managers during the Flint water crisis and the Detroit Public School bailout.“In a case such as Jerry Ambrose, who is being sued individually by the state for his role in the Flint water crisis, my bills would provide a bond which could be seized when gross negligence happens,” said Lucido. “This protects taxpayers. These bills are a straight reintroduction because I want to see oversight, but I want it to be responsible oversight. Whether it is accountants, lawyers or someone taking charge, that individual or group of individuals must perform professionally. More importantly, they must be able to pay if there is negligence or misconduct so that the taxpayer is not the one who pays.”House Bills 4861 and 4862 have been referred to the House Committee on Local Government. Categories: Lucido News,Newslast_img read more

Rep Kesto FGM package officially protects children

first_img10Oct Rep. Kesto: FGM package officially protects children State Rep. Klint Kesto’s key legislation in a bipartisan package outlawing female genital mutilation (FGM) became effective Monday.Kesto’s bill specifically revokes a medical professional’s state license if convicted of performing a FGM, which is any procedure performed on girls to remove or damage the external genitalia. The eight-bill package also prohibits the procedure, sets sentencing guidelines, improves educational programs for health and law enforcement officials, and extends the civil and criminal statute of limitations for victims.The legislation was signed on July 11 and became enforceable after a 90-day window.“One more mutilation of a child is one too many, so I hope these new laws send the message that this will no longer take place without significant repercussions in the state of Michigan,” said Kesto, chair of the House Law and Justice Committee. “All I needed to know was that this is most frequently being done on girls without their specific consent and included the likelihood of lifelong physical and mental damage. There’s no place for this in our society.”As chair of the Law and Justice Committee, Kesto led the charge on the comprehensive legislation through the state Legislature as it passed through the House and senate chambers in two weeks. The bill package follows a February incident where two young girls from Minnesota were subjected to the procedure at a southeast Michigan clinic. A Livonia couple was arrested on federal charges in April after allowing and performing the procedure after hours at their medical clinic, while a third individual has been fired from their emergency room doctor position for performing the procedure at the same Livonia clinic.“Laws are in place to protect our citizens, especially our youngest ones,” said Kesto, of Commerce Township. “The case that has drawn so much attention in southeast Michigan is beyond horrific. My hope is this will never be done again, for the sake of the young girls who were not given a choice when this horrific procedure was done.”Kesto’s legislation is now Public Act 75 of 2017.##### Categories: Kesto News,Newslast_img read more

Rep Miller Plan brings accountability transparency to petition drives

first_img Categories: Miller News,News State Rep. Aaron Miller said a plan approved this week by the Michigan House will provide more transparency for voters and enhance the integrity of the state’s citizen petition initiative process.The bills – sponsored by both Republicans and Democrats – make much-needed improvements to Michigan’s grassroots lawmaking process while boosting accountability and giving voters in rural areas and small towns a greater voice.“Voters in St. Joseph and Cass counties deserve to participate in the initiative process just as much as voters in Michigan’s big cities,” said Miller, R-Sturgis. “Right now, many rural communities are ignored when petition circulators gather signatures for proposals to amend state law – especially when they’re funded by rich, out-of-state special interests. This proposal ensures voters across Michigan participate in the decision on whether an initiative proposal should move forward.”House Bill 6595, sponsored by Rep. Jim Lower (R-Cedar Lake), includes the following protections:Requires that not more than 15 percent of certified signatures come from any one congressional district, guaranteeing more circulation in rural areas.Requires initiative campaigns to provide a short summary at the top of their petitions, ensuring people can quickly size up the issue.Makes absolutely clear that if a petition circulator deceives people or provides fraudulent information, the signatures they collect must be invalidated.House Bills 4635, 5208 and 5209, sponsored by Jeremy Moss (D- Southfield) and Leslie Love (D-Detroit), implement the following reforms:Prohibit circulators from misrepresenting the contents of a proposed ballot question or recall petition.Prohibit circulators from misrepresenting whether they are a paid or volunteer signature gatherer.Require petition circulators to wear identification badges.Ban organizations from employing someone as a petition signature gatherer if they have been convicted of an election crime.Give voters an option to remove their name and signature from a ballot question or recall petition.The legislation advances to the Senate for consideration.### 13Dec Rep. Miller: Plan brings accountability, transparency to petition driveslast_img read more

Pope Invited to Address Congress Next Year and the Spin Begins

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesMarch 13, 2014; ReutersYesterday, U.S. House Speaker John Boehner issued an invitation to Pope Francis to address a joint session of Congress next year. Immediately, Republicans and Democrats alike are attempting to spin the Pope’s views on poverty and capitalism to fit with their respective agendas.Boehner, a Catholic, said in a statement, “Pope Francis has inspired millions of Americans with his pastoral manner and servant leadership, challenging all people to lead lives of mercy, forgiveness, solidarity, and humble service.” But then he went on to try to seize the day by saying that Americans “have embraced Pope Francis’ reminder that we cannot meet our responsibility to the poor with a welfare mentality based on business calculations. We can meet it only with personal charity on the one hand and sound, inclusive policies on the other.”Nancy Pelosi, House Democratic Leader, is also Catholic and laid her own less wordy and overreaching claim—but then, she knows that the Pope will soon be meeting up with President Obama. “Pope Francis has lived his values and upheld his promise to be a moral force, to protect the poor and the needy, to serve as a champion of the less fortunate, and to promote love and understanding among faiths and nations,” Pelosi said.Meanwhile, New York Magazine asks, “Can Pope Francis Bring Peace to Congress?” Immediately answering themselves with an “Almost definitely not,” its short article points out that the Pope yesterday tweeted “Please pray for me” and wondered aloud if this exhortation was related to the invite.—Ruth McCambridgeShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more